Dedicated to Our Troops

 I was listening to an old Kraft Music Hall Radio program on my XM Radio this evening from December 24, 1942.  In it, one of the sponsors read a letter J.L. Kraft had written to his employees at  Christmastime.  The letter stirred me, and I felt its relevance still today.

During World Wars 1 and 2, American families who had a son in the wars would hand a service flag in their window.  I’m admittedly uneducated about service flags (which we can liken now to our yellow ribbons) so I naturally googled it.  Here is the answer I got:

“The Service Flag is an official banner authorized by the Department of Defense for display by families who have members serving in the Armed Forces during any period of war or hostilities the United States may be engaged in for the duration of such hostilities.”  This was from USFlag.org.

I was so stirred by the letter and its relevance today, that I found the radio program this evening on Youtube and copied it down.  Here is the text, and I’d like to dedicate it now to my friends and family who have served this country, continue to serve, and my friends and family who have dear ones serving now in Afghanastan, Iraq and around the world.

“To my friends,

Each weekday morning, as I walk into the Chicago office, the first sight that greets my eyes is our great service flag  – a flag whose stars are ever growing in number.  More than eight hundred blue stars are there, emblazoned on a white field in this December of 1942.  Almost every morning there are a few more added to the luster of the flag.  On Sunday mornings, when I go into my home church, I am greeted by another service flag with more than two hundred represented there.

Walking along the city streets wherever I go, I see more and more windows lighted with a glory that was never there before.  As I see the service flags which mean so much to us personally, I’m reminded that the meaning of each star is two-fold.  Each service flag in a window means not alone that there is a member absent from that family circlej, but is a symbol that the enduring light of home still shines for him, and that it shall not be extinguished.  That it is for his home and the multitude of homes that make up the United States of America that he fights around the globe today.

This Christmastime, when we turn our thoughts and hearts to our boys so far away and their thoughts are warm and strong enough to reach around the Earth and back to us, the light of this sacred birthday is a lamp unto our feet, bringing us all home in thought, and love, and faith and rekindled devotion.  The stars on our service flags take their light from a holy star, that one which lead the wisemen of old.

May the abiding glory of Christmastime be upon you and upon yours where ever they may be.  May it be our constant prayer that before another Christmas dawn shall break, the everylasting light may have overcome the darkness of the Earth.

Sincerely,

J.L. Kraft”

Whether or not you celebrate Christmas, please please please remember to pray for the safety and well being of our troops overseas.  Thank a soldier.  Hug a soldier if you can and remember that for every service member who is within your reach, there is another separated from family and home and all they love this holiday season.

A sincere thank you to all who serve.  May this holiday find you safe, warm and with family and friends.

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. John
    Dec 30, 2010 @ 01:29:06

    Just wanted to say a big thank you for posting this letter from J. L. Kraft. I too, heard the same broadcast on XM and was moved by the words. In fact, I emailed the Kraft company to see if they could produce the letter, but they were unable to. Thanks, so much, for reproducing it here.

    Reply

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